Lego Worlds – Seven Days Later

I’m still not ready to review Lego Worlds, I’ve been playing it for seven days straight, and I still feel like I’m just scratching the surface. (Normally this would sound like a good thing, but if you’d read my first impressions of Lego Worlds, you’d see I find the surface to be deeply flawed.) I promised myself I’d stick with the game until I unlocked the 100 gold bricks that unlock world creation, and so I will, but in the meantime it’s hard to forget how divided I am over the experience still.

I still hate the early game grind for gold bricks, but I blame myself a little more than I did last week. What seemed, at first, to be a ridiculous restriction nobody in their right mind could like, feels a little bit more subjective now. I’ve been streaming the game, so there are times I’ve had to force myself to stop hunting for gold bricks just because the audience is getting a little tired of it. In those moments the game starts to feel more fun. The quests are still shallow and tired, but requiring myself to stop and have a building session often creates my most entertaining moments with the game. It has left me feeling like maybe it’s my own interpretation of the questing that is at fault. If I’d just stopped a while in the first world and built, let myself feel part of the proceedings, maybe I’d feel less like the game was holding key features back.

The quests are still shallow and tired, but requiring myself to stop and have a building session often creates my most entertaining moments with the game. It has left me feeling like maybe it’s my own interpretation of the questing that is at fault. If I’d just stopped a while in the first world and built, let myself feel part of the proceedings, maybe I’d feel less like the game was holding key features back. Anyone can, if that like, stop and build in the Worlds you find. Questing isn’t essential unless you want to randomly find larger planets. I continue to believe the game disincentivises building, and presents a structured experience that isn’t reflective of the main body of the game, but it’s partly my own failing that I feel so uncomfortable removing myself from that structure and working with what it gives me.

Lego Worlds Xbox One

My worry is still that unlocking 100 bricks will take so long that I’ll have sunk a good fifteen hours into the game before I get there. Spending all that time on a treasure hunt just to unlock a free-form crafting mode intended to be the game’s centrepiece feels like a colossal waste of time, and brings back that paranoid feeling that maybe I’m playing the game wrong which we all know is impossible, but feels like a more realistic fear here than in most other games I’ve played.

What I didn’t expect, however, was the joy I’ve found in unlocking new characters and vehicles. The items are mostly a bust, as the game’s inventory UI is atrocious, but finding new cars and skeletons and stuff to bounce around with captures that toybox feel the game is going for.

I’m still going to push for the 100 gold bricks first. I’m in the 70s now and it seems silly to stop the quest so close to completion, but I’m wondering if I couldn’t have found a more satisfying approach right from the start. At times I feel a little cheated by the game, like in its quest to offer freedom, it accidentally led me to believe I had this huge limitation, that isn’t really a limitation, and that I’m free to dive in whenever I like. Then I start to build and remember that until I can make my own worlds, these spaces are just temporary and I’ll soon be hopping to the next.

The game never discourages me, and it’s the path the tutorials sent me on… Who am I to argue. Anyway, that’s where I’m at with it right now. I’ve still got a lot of gold bricks to grind through before I can free things up, so for now I’m basically holding on to the hope that the game changes completely for me once I’ve unlocked that world creation.