Why I Bought Vanilla Destiny, and Why I Don’t Regret it.

I was never really sold on Destiny.

It’s a personal thing, I guess; I never loved online shooters. I play ’em today, sure, Battlefront, Overwatch… Destiny, but it’s a pretty recent development. Online games only started to resonate with me when they adopted more narrative and structural elements the modes fresh, and I was pretty behind the times. I can play a few rounds of Deathmatch but it was only Battlefront’s Walker Assault mode last year that sold me on the concept. (Say what you like about the lack of a campaign but when those AT-ATs drop, you really feel the Star Wars.) Overwatch does the same, putting gameplay front and centre but building narrative into the environment; multiplayer shooters really upped their game while I wasn’t looking.

Destiny Moon Horizon

When it launched most folks kept describing Destiny was “an MMO… sort of.” So I skipped it; as time went on however, it never fully fell off my radar. The game was starting to sound pretty good too, my buddy (and podcast co-host) Jon would entice me with stories of a complex but subtly told narrative, story based events and online matches seamlessly integrated into an MMO style structure, and shooting that was somewhere between Halo and Borderlands.

I wanted in, but I hit my next hurdle.

By the time I was really interested, The Taken King expansion was out; it looked great, but the changes it made to the game were considered sweeping and transformative. Word was it just wasn’t worth getting the game without it, and bundles including The Taken King replaced the main game on the PSN store; the price went back to a full RRP game. Used copies were cheaper, of course, but I’d still be without the DLC and the word was The Taken King updates had actually taken the radical step of removing content from vanilla players all together. I was stuck.

I’d like to remind you of something you don’t see in gaming press that often. Games are expensive, often unreasonably so. I have my channel, my podcast, and my blog; I play a lot of games, but I’m not an industry insider. I buy the vast majority of my games, and I’m living on a youtuber’s budget. Truth is, DLC or otherwise, I couldn’t jump in on the budget The Taken King wanted. I skipped it, and as they have continued releasing expansions regularly enough to keep a bundle on the store at new-game price, Destiny’s business model has kept me from ever being able to buy the game in the form they want me to. As much as I was interested, I can’t justify paying £60 for a game I might not like.

The Tower in Destiny

So I went to a used game store and bought a vanilla disc for £5. I figured DLC be damned, the tiny demo was long gone from the store, and whatever content was still there would give me something to go it. It was one of the best gaming decisions I ever made. If you haven’t played it, I think you should do the same.

I like Destiny. I don’t know how much I’d be liking it if I paid full price, but I’m enjoying the base game immensely. In fact, it might be the most fun I’ve had with a multiplayer game in years, and I’m playing it completely solo, totally out of date, and happily from my DLC free disc. This isn’t going to be a path that would work for everybody, if you’re primarily in it for the multiplayer you’ll be disappointed. Most other players are higher level than me, and I’m locked out of a good two thirds of the content, but what I can do is play through the same story new players did back in the day, and get a feel for it without putting down a huge sum of money. I can still jump in with other players if I want to, and despite the fact that the DLC I’m locked off from is right there on the map, I don’t feel like I’m getting a crippled experience. I’m playing through a lot of the early missions again with a friend now, and we”re both experience the same surprised satisfaction. Destiny’s standalone disc is dirt cheap because they’ve done such a great job sell the DLC that nobody wants it, and yet there’s a full fat, big budget game in here that is still perfectly playable.

I still have issues with Destiny, I think the pricing model creates a situation where new players and old players both lose, I think the removal of content people paid for through updates is pretty crummy, and I think the hyping up of the DLC as essential (to the point of removing cheaper, older, base copies from sale) is quite misleading, but this is the surrounding business and doesn’t change the fact that the original package is actually great.

If I were putting the game out, at this point I’d probably just make the vanilla game free and get new players on board. As cheap as  used copies are, it couldn’t hurt, and the model works. I’m already seriously considering the DLC some time in the new year, and I’m a lot more positive about Destiny 2.